RLGN 335 Exam 1

RLGN 335 Exam 1 Liberty University

Set 1

  1. Cessationists often argue that tongues and other “supernatural” gifts have been historically practiced by many non­Christian religious or cultic groups, and therefore such experiences invalidate the present manifestation of similar signs in contemporary Charismatic circles.
  2. The classical view embraces the fact that Scripture does not shy away from attributing both divine and human attributes, activities and titles to Jesus.
  3. According to the Roman Catholic Church, the primacy of Peter in founding the church at Rome, along with the words of Christ, “Thou art Peter, and upon this rock I will build me church,” provides the rationale for the papacy.
  4. The Christian theologian Tertullian was an early proponent of the Gnostic view denying the humanity of Christ.
  5. At the Council of Nicaea, Eusebius presented a “middle position” wherein Christ could rightly be called “God,” yet his substance is different from that of God the Father.
  6. Match the following view with its corresponding definition.
    1. Classical view of Christology
    2. The Kenotic View of Christology
  1. Although the Roman Catholic Church once taught the bodily assumption of Mary into heaven, this dictate has been repealed by Vatican II.
  2. The veneration of Mary became an increasingly potent problem when the Roman Empire embraced Christianity as its official religion. This was due to the synchronization of pagan beliefs with Christianity.
  3. The egalitarian position often appeals to oneness in Christ (Galatians 3:28) as a means to support their position.
  4. According to the kenotic view, the Greek word kenosisas used in Philippians 2:7 literally means “emptied”, and in reference to Christ, means that he emptied himself of divine attributes in the incarnation.
  5. Cessationists often argue that the sign gifts, along with the offices of apostle and prophet, were foundational to the church, and since the foundation is now laid, they are no longer needed.
  6. The kenotic view explains Jesus’ miracles by attributing Jesus’ supernatural abilities to the Holy Spirit or to the Father, both of whom were working through him.
  7. Cessationists appeal to 1 Corinthians 13:8­12, often claiming that the “perfect” or “complete” thing which will cause certain sign gifts to cease is in reality the completed New Testament.
  8. The egalitarian view appeals to the role relationships among the persons of the Trinity as a means to support their position.
  9. Gnosticism, being influenced by the philosophy of Plato, denied both the full deity of Christ as well as his full humanity.
  10. Roman Catholic theology teaches that Mary remained a virgin until her death (although married to Joseph).
  11. According to Lutzer, it is not important what kind of Christ one believes in, as long as one has authentic faith in Christ.
  12. In Roman Catholic theology,The Immaculate Conceptionis the belief that Mary conceived Jesus without original sin.
  13. During the period of the middle ages, the pope could keep kings and princes in line under his authority through the threat of excommunication.
  14. Continuationists do not have any biblical support for their position; they simply are arguing from a position of experience.
  15. The egalitarian view believes that Paul’s injunctions regarding women’s roles in 1 Corinthians 11:3­16 and 1 Timothy 2:8­15 were culturally relative. In today’s culture, where women are better educated, they have no transferable application.
  16. The classical Christological view is sometimes called “two minds Christology”.
  17. At the Council of Nicaea, Arius won the argument and Arianism became the officially endorsed position of Constantine’s empire.
  18. The teaching called “Monarchianism” held that the three persons of the “Trinity” were actually modes in which one person manifested himself.
  19. For the Roman Catholic, when the pope speaks ex cathedra, he is infallible.

Set 2

  1. According to Lutzer, it is not important what kind of Christ one believes in, as long as one has authentic faith in Christ.
  2. According to the kenotic view, the Greek word kenosis as used in Philippians 2:7 literally means “emptied”, and in reference to Christ, means that he emptied himself of divine attributes in the incarnation.
  3. The classical view embraces the fact that Scripture does not shy away from attributing both divine and human attributes, activities and titles to Jesus.
  4. According to the Roman Catholic Church, the primacy of Peter in founding the church at Rome, along with the words of Christ, “Thou art Peter, and upon this rock I will build me church,” provides the rationale for the papacy.
  5. Match the following view with its corresponding definition.
  6. The Christian theologian Tertullian was an early proponent of the Gnostic view denying the humanity of Christ.
  7. The kenotic view explains Jesus’ miracles by attributing Jesus’ supernatural abilities to the Holy Spirit or to the Father, both of whom were working through him.
  8. Roman Catholic theology teaches that Mary remained a virgin until her death (although married to Joseph).
  9. The veneration of Mary became an increasingly potent problem when the Roman Empire embraced Christianity as its official religion. This was due to the synchronization of pagan beliefs with Christianity.
  10. The teaching called “Monarchianism” held that the three persons of the “Trinity” were actually modes in which one person manifested himself.
  11. The monk Nestorius defended the view that Christ was two people – the Son of Man and the Son of God. This view was later condemned at the Council of Ephesus.
  12. The classical Christological view teaches that Jesus was actually two persons in the incarnation; the divine person and the human person.
  13. Cessationists often argue that the sign gifts, along with the offices of apostle and prophet, were foundational to the church, and since the foundation is now laid, they are no longer needed.
  14. Cessationists appeal to 1 Corinthians 13:8­12, often claiming that the “perfect” or “complete” thing which will cause certain sign gifts to cease is in reality the completed New Testament.
  15. Continuationists generally argue that cessationists are being arbitrary in how they divide the biblical “gift lists” between sign gifts that have ceased and ministry gifts which continue in the present age.
  16. Charles the Great, also known as Charlemagne, conquered Rome and supplanted the influence of the Pope over Western Europe.
  17. The egalitarian position often appeals to oneness in Christ (Galatians 3:28) as a means to support their position.
  18. At the Council of Nicaea, Eusebius presented a “middle position” wherein Christ could rightly be called “God,” yet his substance is different from that of God the Father.
  19. At the Council of Nicaea, Arius won the argument and Arianism became the officially endorsed position of Constantine’s empire.
  20. The primary debate at The Council of Nicaea pitted the position championed by Arius (that Christ was a created lesser god) against the position defended by Athanasius (that Christ was fully God and had the same essence as the Father).
  21. Gnosticism, being influenced by the philosophy of Plato, denied both the full deity of Christ as well as his full humanity.
  22. During the period of the middle ages, the pope could keep kings and princes in line under his authority through the threat of excommunication.
  23. Continuationists do not have any biblical support for their position; they simply are arguing from a position of experience.
  24. The document known as Leo’s tome stated that attributes of both natures of Christ (divine and human) can be affirmed in one person, but how this happens remains a mystery.
  25. The egalitarian view appeals to the role relationships among the persons of the Trinity as a means to support their position.
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