PHIL 201 Quiz 5

PHIL 201 Quiz 5 Liberty University Answers

Set 1

  1. The answers to the skeptical challenge suggested in the pointecast presentation include:
  2. To say that a belief is defeasible is to say;
  3. According to externalism one must be aware of whether his cognitive processes are functioning properly or not.
  4. Karen says she doesn’t believe that you can ever have real knowledge. When asked if she claims to know that as a fact, she says no, but she believes that is the case. What category would you place her in:
  5. Coherentism holds that some beliefs are more foundational than others.
  6. Which is not one of the ways that Wood says moral and intellectual virtues parallel each other?
  7. Aristotle said that virtue is the “mean between two vices, one of excess and one of deficiency.”
  8. For Aristotle, the “Golden Mean” points to fixed and universal ethical norms for all people to follow.
  9. Virtue epistemologists think that intellectual virtues might helps us with the Gettier problem by:
  10. Thomas Aquinas thought that moral and intellectual virtues were closely related.
  11. One reason why certainty in knowledge is not likely a reasonable alternative to unmitigated skepticism is because
  12. If Robert thinks that the only way in this world for a person to know whether God exists is to have some kind of sensory experience of God, along with an active mind that is able to process, structure and arrange ones experiences in a way that makes sense to him, then Robert would be following Kant in thinking that:
  13. Sextus Empiricus adopted a version of Pyhrro’s skepticism mainly because he believed that
  14. The one below that it NOT a reason Hume argued against the principle of causality :
  15. To suggest that we should suspend all judgments about any claim to knowledge,
is to suggest a softer and mitigated form of skepticism in contrast to its more unmitigated expressions.
  16. It is a commonly accepted fact that it is impossible to be certain about any belief
  17. Coherentism in epistemology is a position which holds that a
particular belief is justified for a person so long as that belief is consistent with everything else that person holds to be true.
  18. The internalist in terms of epistemic justification thinks that
  19. Select the one below that does NOT belong : The justification of one’s beliefs is a matter that deals with
  20. The problem with W. K. Clifford’s statement “It is wrong always, everywhere and for anyone, to believe anything upon insufficient evidence” is that:

Set 2

  1. Noetic structure refers to:
  2. The doxastic assumption is:
  3. The areas on knowledge that Descartes doubted include:
  4. Rene Descartes was a:
  5. Clifford was a:
  6. The intellectual virtue of studiousness leads one to seek knowledge with the right kind of motives and desires.
  7. Intellectual virtue is best described as:
  8. Vices might be described as characteristics that are destructive in nature.
  9. Virtue epistemologists think that intellectual virtues might helps us with the Gettier problem by:
  10. Which of the following is not one of Aristotle’s virtues mentioned by Dew & Foreman?
  11. One of the philosophical benefits of skepticism is that
  12. When the used car salesman tells Steve that the particular car he is considering purchasing has less than fifteen thousand actual miles on it, Steve is, quite naturally, a bit skeptical about this claim, particularly since the car is over ten years old and looks a little worse for wear. In exhibiting this level of doubt, Steve is expressing:
  13. Among some of the reasons why unmitigated skepticism is difficult for a person to consistently hold as a serious philosophical position is because
  14. Hume thinks that, while we may assume connections of causality (i.e., every event has a cause), we never actually perceive a necessary connection of causality and therefore we cannot know a causal connection has actually occurred.
  15. Which of the following is NOT commonly given by philosophers as a reason for adopting some form of skepticism:
  16. Ginger believes that the dog she sees in her neighbor’s back yard is her own
Labrador Retriever named Sam. Since there are no other Labrador Retrievers in the neighborhood fitting the same description as Sam, and since the dog Ginger sees in her neighbor’s yard seems to recognize Ginger’s voice when she calls out to it, Ginger quite naturally believes the dog in her neighbor’s back yard is her dog Sam. It turns out, however, that the dog in her neighbor’s back yard is in fact not Ginger’s dog but the Labrador of a visiting relative of her neighbor. On an internalist account of justification, since it turns out not to be true that Ginger saw her dog Sam in her neighbor’s back yard, Ginger was not justified in believing it was her own dog in the first place.
  17. Select the one below that does NOT belong : The justification of one’s beliefs is a matter that deals with
  18. When we consider the way that our beliefs relate to each other, we are making a reference to
  19. If Jacob thinks there is overwhelming evidence for the existence of God, especially in light of what he thinks is the apparent design and fine‐tuning of the universe, but John claims that the obvious existence of evil argues against the rationality of Jacob’s belief in the existence of God, then John has
  20. If an individual is an externalist in terms of epistemic warrant, then that person thinks that

Set 3

  1. When considering our noetic structure we recognize that we hold beliefs in varying degrees of strength.
  2. The motivation behind externalism is:
  3. Coherentism holds that some beliefs are more foundational than others.
  4. According to externalism one must be aware of whether his cognitive processes are functioning properly or not.
  5. The view in which the basing relationship between beliefs is deductive:
  6. Intellectual virtue is best described as:
  7. Aristotle thought that the virtues are present naturally in all people.
  8. The intellectual virtue of humility can be described as the mean between:
  9. Vices might be described as characteristics that are destructive in nature.
  10. Discussions of vice and virtues tend to arise within which major area of philosophy?
  11. When Larry claims definitely and dogmatically that he knows we cannot know anything at all, he is expressing:
  12. According to Dew and Foreman, most rational people believe that it is extremely rarely for our senses to mislead us.
  13. One of the factors that fuels skepticism is our inability to demonstrate epistemic certainty about many of the beliefs we think are true.
  14. If skepticism is an indefensible philosophical position to hold, then by the process of elimination, epistemic certainty is the only reasonable alternative.
  15. Robert is a scientist who firmly believes in empirical truths and the physical laws of causality (e.g. when he builds a fire in his fireplace, it will produce heat), but he expresses serious reservations about the rational credibility of whether there are objective moral virtues, such as goodness, or whether such a being as the traditional God of theism does in fact exist. In such a case, Robert is expressing a form of
  16. Coherentism in epistemology is a position which holds that a
particular belief is justified for a person so long as that belief is consistent with everything else that person holds to be true.
  17. Those holding to some form of externalism in rationality tend to argue that, since it is impossible for persons to have any cognitive access to the reasons and evidence that support some of a person’s beliefs, internalists cannot be right with respect to their account of justification for all beliefs.
  18. Suppose a person is deeply concerned about whether her belief in God is rational. In order to make this determination, she reflects on the kind of evidence she thinks she has for God’s existence (e.g., the apparent design and beauty of the universe, the existence of other sentient beings, the almost universal acceptance of some degree of objective morality, etc.). In light of her awareness of, and access to, this potential evidence, she would be considered:
  19. If Jacob thinks there is overwhelming evidence for the existence of God, especially in light of what he thinks is the apparent design and fine‐tuning of the universe, but John claims that the obvious existence of evil argues against the rationality of Jacob’s belief in the existence of God, then John has
  20. Coherentism is a position in epistemic justification which holds that
  21. You noetic structure concerns only those beliefs that are actually true.
  22. Christopher Columbus was convinced that he discovered a route to the East Indies because it lined up with his maps and the current beliefs of his day. However, he was wrong. This example demonstrates a problem with:
  23. Coherentism holds that some beliefs are more foundational than others.
  24. The areas on knowledge that Descartes doubted include:
  25. Noetic structure refers to:
  26. Aristotle said that virtue is the “mean between two vices, one of excess and one of deficiency.”
  27. The intellectual virtue of studiousness leads one to seek knowledge with the right kind of motives and desires.
  28. Thomas Aquinas thought that moral and intellectual virtues were closely related.
  29. Virtue epistemologists think that intellectual virtues might helps us with the Gettier problem by:
  30. Which of the following is not one of Aristotle’s virtues mentioned by Dew & Foreman?
  31. To suggest that we should suspend all judgments about any claim to knowledge,
is to suggest a softer and mitigated form of skepticism in contrast to its more unmitigated expressions.
  32. One reason why certainty in knowledge is not likely a reasonable alternative to unmitigated skepticism is because
  33. Which of the following is NOT commonly given by philosophers as a reason for adopting some form of skepticism:
  34. When Larry claims de nitely and dogmatically that he knows we cannot know anything at all, he is expressing:
  35. Among some of the reasons why unmitigated skepticism is di cult for a person to consistently hold as a serious philosophical position is because
  36. My belief is a justi ed belief if and only if it is, in fact, a true belief.
  37. When we consider the way that our beliefs relate to each other, we are making a reference to
  38. Select the one below that is NOT a difficulty with W.K. Clifford’s approach to evidentialism
  39. It is a commonly accepted fact that it is impossible to be certain about any belief
  40. Coherentism is a position in epistemic justification which holds that
  41. Karen says she doesn’t believe that you can ever have real knowledge. When asked if she claims to know that as a fact, she says no, but she believes that is the case. What category would you place her in:
  42. By “high accessibility requirements” the internalist means:
  43. According to externalism, there is really no way to test if one’s memories are reliable, but, in the absence of defeaters, one is reasonable in holding that they are.
  44. The answers to the skeptical challenge suggested in the pointecast presentation include:
  45. According to externalism one must be aware of whether his cognitive processes are functioning properly or not.
  46. Aristotle said that virtue is the “mean between two vices, one of excess and one of deficiency.”
  47. The intellectual virtue of studiousness leads one to seek knowledge with the right kind of motives and desires.
  48. Humility helps us fight against intellectual vices like pride and vanity that keep us from seeing the truth.
  49. Intellectual courage helps us to:
  50. Which is not one of the ways that Wood says moral and intellectual virtues parallel each other?
  51. According to Dew and Foreman, most rational people believe that it is extremely rarely for our senses to mislead us.
  52. When Descartes employs systematic doubt against the beliefs he holds, he discovers that:
  53. One reason why certainty in knowledge is not likely a reasonable alternative to unmitigated skepticism is because
  54. Sextus Empiricus adopted a version of Pyhrro’s skepticism mainly because he believed that
  55. When Larry claims de nitely and dogmatically that he knows we cannot know anything at all, he is expressing:
  56. Select the one below that is NOT a di culty with W.K. Cli ord’s approach to evidentialism
  57. It is a commonly accepted fact that it is impossible to be certain about any belief
  58. The problem with W. K. Clifford’s statement “It is wrong always, everywhere and for anyone, to believe anything upon insufficient evidence” is that:
  59. Externalism in epistemology is an approach to rationality which argues that
  60. The internalist in terms of epistemic justification thinks that
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