ENGL 102 Quiz Poetry Unit

ENGL 102 Quiz: Poetry Unit

  1. In line 3, the boy is calling out his trade; instead of “sweep,” he cries “weep weep weep weep.” This is the poet’s way of telling the reader that
  2. The dream in lines 11-20 is a miniature allegory that has several analogies to the world in which the boys live. The “coffins of black” (line 12) represent
  3. The dream in lines 11-20 is a miniature allegory that has several analogies to the world in which the boys live. The “Angel who had a bright key /And … open’d the coffins and set them all free” (line 13-14) represents
  4. The poet protests against child labor and condemns the harm done to children exploited in this practice. Yet in lines 23-24, the child narrator writes that “Tho’ the morning was cold, Tom was happy and warm / So if all do their duty, they need not fear harm.” This is dramatic irony in the sense that
  5. The poet protests against child labor and condemns the harm done to children exploited in this practice. Yet in lines 23-24, the child narrator writes that “Tho’ the morning was cold, Tom was happy and warm / So if all do their duty, they need not fear harm.” This is an ironic expression of the narrator’s
  6. Lines 9-12 of William Shakespeare’s “That Time of Year…” reads: “In me thou seest the glowing of such fire, / That on the ashes of his youth doth lie, / As the death-bed whereon it must expire, / Consum’d with that which it was nourish’d by.” In these lines, the speaker metaphorically compares himself to
  7. Lines 11-12 of Gerard Manley Hopkins’ “God’s Grandeur” reads: “And though the last lights off the black West went / Oh, morning, at the brown brink eastward, springs—” The images of sunset and sunrise symbolize God’s
  8. Lines 7-8 of Gerard Manley Hopkins’ “God’s Grandeur” reads: And wears man’s smudge and shares man’s smell: the soil / Is bare now, nor can foot feel, being shod.” “The soil / Is bare” because
  9. Lines 11-14 of Gerard Manley Hopkins’ “God’s Grandeur” reads: “And though the last lights off the black West went / Oh, morning, at the brown brink eastward, springs—/ Because the Holy Ghost over the bent / World broods with warm breast and with ah! bright wings.” The word “bent” in line 13 means
  10. In the poem “Virtue” by George Herbert, the line “The dew shall weep thy fall tonight” exemplifies
  11. The last 5 lines of “Ozymandias” by Percy Bysshe Shelley reads: “My name is Ozymandias, king of kings: / Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!” / Nothing beside remains. Round the decay / Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare / The lone and level sands stretch far away.” The crumbling statue, “decay,” “colossal wreck,” “boundless and bare /…lone and level sands” all communicate thematic ideas of
  12. Lines 5-8 of William Shakespeare’s “That Time of Year…” reads: “In me thou seest the twilight of such day / As after sunset fadeth in the west, / Which by and by black night doth take away, / Death’s second self, that seals up all in rest.” In these lines, the speaker metaphorically compares himself to
  13. Lines 1-4 of William Shakespeare’s “That Time of Year…” reads: “That time of year thou mayst in me behold / When yellow leaves, or none, or few, do hang / Upon those boughs which shake against the cold, / Bare ruin’d choirs, where late the sweet birds sang.” These lines emphasize
  14. The last 5 lines of “Ozymandias” by Percy Bysshe Shelley reads: “My name is Ozymandias, king of kings: / Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!” / Nothing beside remains. Round the decay / Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare / The lone and level sands stretch far away.” One can infer from these lines that the subject was once
  15. The first line of “Ozymandias” by Percy Bysshe Shelley reads, “I met a traveler from an antique land.” Antique here best means:
  16. Line 7 of George Herbert’s “Virtue” reads: “Thy root is ever in its grave.” The word “grave” is metonymy for
  17. Lines 1-4 of William Shakespeare’s “That Time of Year…” reads: “That time of year thou mayst in me behold / When yellow leaves, or none, or few, do hang / Upon those boughs which shake against the cold, / Bare ruin’d choirs, where late the sweet birds sang.” In these lines, the speaker metaphorically compares himself to
  18. The phrase “Death’s second self, that seals up all in rest” (line 8) in William Shakespeare’s “That Time of Year…” is a metaphor for
  19. Line 3 of George Herbert’s “Virtue” reads: “The dew shall weep thy fall tonight.” The word “fall” means
  20. Lines 1-4 of Gerard Manley Hopkins’ “God’s Grandeur” reads: THE WORLD is charged with the grandeur of God / It will flame out, like shining from shook foil; / It gathers to a greatness, like the ooze of oil / Crushed. Why do men then now not reck his rod?” The word “rod” is a metaphor or symbol for
  21. According to the lecture notes, the tropes in _____ relate to the childhood of the speaker.
  22. One possible theme of _____ is that responsibilities are more important than the beauties of life.
  23. In “Death Be Not Proud,” Death is personified.
  24. The three major types of irony are verbal irony, dramatic irony, and irony of situation.
  25. In the poem, “Ozymandias,” the main character, Ozymandias, is depicted as a proud servant.
  26. The poem, “God’s Grandeur,” was written by Emily Dickinson.
  27. The term used for words in a rhyming pattern that have some kind of sound correspondence but are not perfect rhymes (example push- rush).
  28. An octave is a ten-line stanza or the first ten lives of a sonnet.
  29. “In the forests of the night, /What immortal hand or eye/ Dare frame thy fearful symmetry” is from what poem?
  30. Lyrical poetry differs from other writing in the fairly small emotional response that it generates.
  31. Edwin Arlington Robinson authored the poem “God’s Grandeur.”
  32. A poem may be unified by a theme, one of the tropes, or by
  33. Shakespeare’s sonnet that deals with the autumn years of his life is entitled
  34. “Chimney Sweeper” uses a dichotomy between the horror that the children experience and what is said.
  35. Which famous critic said that it was vital to know the Bible if one is to understand literature.
  36. Hopkins’ poem, “Spring,” uses sensory perceptions to underscore the theme of the importance of innocence.
  37. “It Sifts from Leaden Sieves” is developed through a series of metaphors for snow.
  38. Examples of rhyme are masculine, feminine, neutral, and end.
  39. A Shakespearean Sonnet has this rhyme scheme: ACAC, BDBD, EFEF, GG.
  40. In this sonnet, _____, the octave introduces a series of images, and the sestet presents two significant symbols.
  41. Personification is the imaginative identification of two dissimilar objects or ideas.
  42. A paradoxical statement is a figure of speech in which an apparently self- contradictory statement is nevertheless found to be true.
  43. Match the following definitions with the appropriate poetic device.
  44. Irony is the situation or use of language involving some kind of incongruity or discrepancy.
  45. A poem’s sound structure is its rhyme scheme and systematic and repeated use of similar sounds.
  46. Another name for Petrarchan sonnet is
  47. The term used for a rhyme in which one or both of the rhyme-words occurs within the line is
  48. “Batter My Heart, Three-Personed God” thematizes the power of ____ to save.
  49. Since “all truth is God’s truth,” we may freely go to poetry to find truth instead of using God’s revelation to us in the Bible to judge poetry.
  50. The metrical structure of a poem is its rhythm pattern of stressed and unstressed syllables.
$2.99
Add to Cart

has been added to your cart!

have been added to your cart!

  • Liberty University
Resume templates under $5, go to GoodResume.io