ENGL 102 Quiz Fiction Unit

ENGL 102 Quiz: Fiction Unit

  1. That little Davy Hutchinson, the small son of the victim, is given a few pebbles to throw at his mother suggests that
  2. What human characteristic is thematized in the excerpt?
  3. The fact that most of the villagers participate in the lottery suggests that
  4. Hutchinson is representative of the whole community because
  5. The setting of the story is ironic because __________.
  6. Read this excerpt from “The Lottery” by Shirley Jackson and answer the question that follows: “Bill Hutchinson was standing quiet, staring down at the paper in his hand. Suddenly, Tessie Hutchinson shouted to Mr. Summers. ‘You didn’t give him time enough to take any paper he wanted. I saw you. It wasn’t fair!’
    ‘Be a good sport, Tessie.’ Mrs. Delacroix called, and Mrs. Graves said, ‘All of us took the same chance.’ Considering the dire consequences for winning “The Lottery,” which of the following statements is ironic and out of place?
  7. Read this excerpt from “The Lottery” by Shirley Jackson and answer the question that follows: “Mr. Summers called his own name and then stepped forward precisely and selected a slip from the box. Then he called, ‘Warner.’ ‘Seventy-seventh year I been in the lottery,’ Old Man Warner said as he went through the crowd. ‘Seventy-seventh time.’ One can infer from this excerpt that not less than _____________ have “won” and fallen victim to the lottery. a
  8. Read this excerpt from “Young Goodman Brown” by Nathaniel Hawthorne and answer the question that follows: “Dearest heart,” whispered [Faith], … “pray thee, put off your journey until sunrise, and sleep in your own bed to-night. A lone woman is troubled with such dreams and such thoughts, that she’s afeard of herself, sometimes. Pray, tarry with me this night, dear husband, of all nights in the year!” “My love and my Faith,” replied young Goodman Brown, “of all nights in the year, this one night must I tarry away from thee. My journey, as thou callest it, forth and back again, must needs be done ‘twixt now and sunrise. Which of the following phrases best explains how Goodman Brown feels about his departure?
  9. Read this excerpt from “The Destructors” by Graham Greene and answer the question that follows: “Blackie lumbered nearer the saw and the sledge- hammer. Perhaps after all nobody had turned up; the plan had been a wild invention; they had woken wiser. But when he came close to the back door he could hear a confusion of sound hardly louder than a hive in swarm; a clickety-clack, a bang bang bang, a scraping, a creaking, a sudden painful crack. He thought; it’s true, and whistled.” Why is confusion an effective choice?
  10. Read this excerpt from “The Destructors” by Graham Greene and answer the question that follows: “There was no sign of anybody anywhere. The loo stood like a tomb in a neglected graveyard. The curtains were drawn. The house slept.” The statement that the “loo stood like a tomb” is an example of?
  11. In Graham Greene’s “The Destructors,” the statement that T’s words “were almost confined to voting ‘Yes’ or ‘No’” suggests that he is
  12. Read this excerpt from “Young Goodman Brown” by Nathaniel Hawthorne and answer the question that follows: “Dearest heart,” whispered [Faith], … “pray thee, put off your journey until sunrise, and sleep in your own bed to-night. A lone woman is troubled with such dreams and such thoughts, that she’s afeard of herself, sometimes. Pray, tarry with me this night, dear husband, of all nights in the year!” “My love and my Faith,” replied young Goodman Brown, “of all nights in the year, this one night must I tarry away from thee. My journey, as thou callest it, forth and back again, must needs be done ‘twixt now and sunrise. It may be inferred from the passage that Faith, the wife, is
  13. Close to the beginning of Graham Greene’s “The Destructors,” this information is given about the gang: The gang met every morning in an impromptu car park, the site of the last bomb of the first blitz. The leader, who was known as Blackie, claimed to have heard it fall, and no one was precise enough in his dates to point out he would have been one year old and fast asleep on the down platform of Wormsley Common Underground station. On one side of the car park leant the first occupied house, No.3. T, whose words were almost confined to voting ‘Yes’ or ‘No’ to the plan of operations proposed each day by Blackie…” From the passage, the evidence is given that members are disinclined to:
  14. Read this excerpt from “Young Goodman Brown” by Nathaniel Hawthorne and answer the question that follows: “Dearest heart,” whispered [Faith], … “pray thee, put off your journey until sunrise, and sleep in your own bed to-night. A lone woman is troubled with such dreams and such thoughts, that she’s afeard of herself, sometimes. Pray, tarry with me this night, dear husband, of all nights in the year!” “My love and my Faith,” replied young Goodman Brown, “of all nights in the year, this one night must I tarry away from thee. My journey, as thou callest it, forth and back again, must needs be done ‘twixt now and sunrise. The word tarry appears twice, first in statements by Faith, and second in Goodman Brown’s reply. What does it mean?
  15. Read this excerpt from “The Lottery” by Shirley Jackson and answer the question that follows: “Be a good sport, Tessie.” Mrs. Delacroix called, and Mrs. Graves said, “All of us took the same chance.” If the word Delacroix (the name of one of the characters in “The Lottery”) means “of the cross,” which of the following figures of speech is used?
  16. Read this excerpt from “The Destructors” by Graham Greene and answer the question that follows: “The loo stood like a tomb in a neglected graveyard. The curtains were drawn. The house slept. Blackie lumbered nearer the saw and the sledge-hammer. Perhaps after all nobody had turned up; the plan had been a wild invention; they had woken wiser. But when he came close to the back door he could hear a confusion of sound hardly louder than a hive in swarm; a clickety-clack, a bang bang bang, a scraping, a creaking, a sudden painful crack.” References to “tomb,” “graveyard,” and “bang bang bang” suggest imminent doom. This is an example of
  17. Read this excerpt from “The Lottery” by Shirley Jackson and answer the question that follows: “Mr. Summers called his own name and then stepped forward precisely and selected a slip from the box. Then he called, ‘Warner.’ ‘Seventy-seventh year I been in the lottery,’ Old Man Warner said as he went through the crowd. ‘Seventy-seventh time.’ ‘Watson’ The tall boy came awkwardly through the crowd. Someone said, ‘Don’t be nervous, Jack,’ and Mr. Summers said, ‘Take your time, son.’ This passage suggests that “The Lottery” uses frame.
  18. Read this excerpt from “The Destructors” by Graham Greene and answer the question that follows: “There was no sign of anybody anywhere. The loo stood like a tomb in a neglected graveyard. The curtains were drawn. The house slept.” “The house slept” is a metaphor for
  19. In “The Destructors” the boys are members of the Wormsley Common Gang. Of the following choices, which shows best the way they operate?
  20. Read this excerpt from “The Lottery” by Shirley Jackson and answer the question that follows: “The night before the lottery, Mr. Summers and Mr. Graves made up the slips of paper and put them in the box, and it was then taken to the safe of Mr. Summers’ coal company and locked up until Mr. Summers was ready to take it to the square next morning.” This excerpt shows a certain incongruity. Which of the following best illustrates this?
  21. The handling of time can be accomplished by the method of the story by straight narrative, scene, analysis, and prescription.
  22. Another possible name for a character who undergoes no change.
  23. “The Destructors” was authored by
  24. Motivation in the short story can be discussed in passages of analysis.
  25. “The Prodigal Son” appears in the Gospel according to
  26. A direct revelation of character is when the traits are mentioned by the author or by another character.
  27. These are actual (historical) persons that appear in Hawthorne’s “Young Goodman Brown,” and were executed at the Salem witchcraft trials in 1692.
  28. is an optimistic belief in induction/deduction, i.e., a belief that particulars can be gathered to formulate universals.
  29. In “The Rocking-Horse Winner,” Hester is Paul’s
  30. Apotheosis means raising to the level of a god.
  31. In “The Rocking-Horse Winner,” Bassett is
  32. Some attributes of Poe’s short stories include unity of impression, unity of purpose, and goal to entertain.
  33. The narrative frame starts to emerge in The Canterbury Tales.
  34. “My love and my Faith,…of all nights in the year this one must I tarry away from thee.” Who made this statement?
  35. Which of the following identifies the term “denouement”?
  36. “Modern man is on a bus going nowhere” may be said to be the theme of
  37. A dynamic character and developing character are synonymous, meaning they both undergo a permanent change.
  38. The short story produces a single impression.
  39. Church history provides much evidence for an antipathy and hostility on the part of Christians (the church) toward literature.
  40. “It’s Malabar!” he screamed, in a powerful, strange voice. “It’s Malabar.”
  41. Short fiction began in America, and Nathaniel Hawthorne added an interest in people’s personalities, emotions, and attitudes.
  42. A “flat” character is one dimensional.
  43. The longest part of a short story, or the part that develops the conflict(s) that will lead to the climax, is termed
  44. The American author who added an interest in people’s personalities, emotions, and attitudes to the writing of short narrative fiction was the
  45. “The Rocking Horse Winner” ends after the death of
  46. “T. raised his eyes, as grey and disturbed as the drab August day. “We’ll pull it down,” he said. This quotation appears in
  47. The telling of tales is as old as mankind, and was in existence before written records.
  48. “The Lottery” can be interpreted via biblical hermeneutics.
  49. Trevor and Blackie are minor characters in “The Destructors.”
  50. The Canterbury Tales is written in the vernacular and about common experiences.
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