PHIL 240 Quiz 5

PHIL 240 Quiz 5 Liberty University

  1. The fact that mark reveals that Jesus’ disciples were slow to recognize his divine identity is evidence that mark was not seeking to theologically embellish his gospel.
  2. The gospel writers each employ the literary device of inclusionas a means to highlight aspects of the divine nature of Jesus.
  3. Even if the gospels were written 30 or 40 years after the resurrection of Christ, this time frame is far too short for the development of legend to have occurred.
  4. The frequent identity of Jesus in the gospels as the “Son of Man” is a strong self-identification that verifies the humanity of Christ (as opposed to any affirmation of divinity).
  5. History clearly affirms that Jesus’ divinity was already assumed by the time that the bishops convened at the Council of Nicea.
  6. In light of the fact that Christianity arose from a monotheistic context, it is not surprising that the early Christians viewed Jesus as a mere mortal prophet and not as God.
  7. Jesus did not leave any written documents of what he said from his own hand, but rather, Christianity is dependent upon his followers for preserving what he said and did in written form.
  8. The fact that Paul often quotes formal corporate hymns and creeds in his letters is valuable because:
  9. When Jesus claimed to be the “Son of God,” he did so in such a manner that affirmed divine recognition.
  10. In Paul’s writings, the title of Jesus as “Lord” is simply an affirmation of his mastery over the lives of his followers and has nothing to do with deity.
  11. In the world in which the church Fathers lived and wrote, embracing the divinity of Jesus was not the problem; embracing his humanity was.
  12. During the first century, Jews had absorbed the culture of Greco-Roman polytheism to such an extent that it made it easier for them to accept the idea of the incarnation. This is evidence of God’s providential timing.
  13. Due to a higher degree of implied objectivity, sources about Jesus from outside of the New Testament are more reliable than those from within the New Testament.
  14. The Arian position at the Council of Nicea was that Jesus (the Son) was in no way equal to the Father and was, in fact, a finite creature.
  15. The fact that the New Testament portrays Jesus as accepting worship is a strong affirmation that Jesus viewed himself as divine.
  16. What makes early worship of Jesus as God truly remarkable is that:
  17. Until the Council of Nicea, the early church fathers and the New Testament writers primarily viewed Jesus as a mortal prophet and not divine.
  18. The Arian position at the Council of Nicea was that Jesus (the Son) was in no way equal to the Father and was, in fact, a finite creature.
  19. While it is clear that the early followers of Jesus thought that he was God, we have very little evidence that Jesus himself thought of himself as God.
  20. History clearly affirms that Jesus’ divinity was already assumed by the time that the bishops convened at the Council of Nicea.
  21. When Jesus claimed to be the “Son of God,” he did so in such a manner that affirmed divine recognition.
  22. The fact that Mark reveals that Jesus’ disciples were slow to recognize his divine identity is evidence that mark was not seeking to theologically embellish his gospel.
  23. Crossan identifies Jesus with this philosophical movement that is characterized by its criticism of society and living in tune with nature:
  24. Even if the gospels were written 30 or 40 years after the resurrection of Christ, this time frame is far too short for the development of legend to have occurred.
  25. The gospel writers preferred to take an indirect approach in revealing the deity of Jesus rather than stating that Jesus was God in a direct manner.
$2.99
Buy Answer Key