COMS 101 Reading Analysis

COMS 101 Reading Analysis Liberty University

Question 1

Use this week’s textbook reading assignment to match the following terms with their definitions.

The use of volume, pitch, tone, accent, speaking pace, and silence to impact a recipient’s interpretation of his or her message and motives.

The use of gestures, facial expressions and eye contact to impact a recipient’s interpretation of his or her message and motives.

The use of space to impact a recipient’s interpretation of his or her message and motives.

The sender’s use of touch to impact a recipient’s interpretation of his or her message and motives.

The sender’s use of time or timing to impact a recipient’s interpretation of his or her message and motives.

The sender’s use of material objects to impact a recipient’s interpretation of his or her message and motives.

Social interaction among two or more people, usually in a face‐to‐ face environment, but possibly also in real‐time virtual environments.

Interaction among three or more people who come together for a common purpose.

When a speaker formally addresses a group of typically 10 or more individuals in a face‐to‐face environment where interactivity is possible but generally not practiced.

When people use a media technology to distribute information to a large group of physically detached people.

Question 2

Use this week’s textbook reading assignment to match the following terms with their definitions.

Question

A figurative form identifies one thing in a way that symbolically stands for another thing, such as when Martin Luther, in his great hymn, describes God as a mighty fortress

A figurative form explicitly compares two otherwise dissimilar things, usually via the modifiers like or as, such as when the poet Robert Burns wrote, “My love is like a red, red rose.”

A figurative form that alludes to something by either highlighting only one aspect of it or something broader that includes it, such as when journalists use the term Washington as a reference to America’s federal government.

The figurative use of a mild term in place of a harsh term to relay the same basic idea in a more tasteful form, such as when we say that someone “passed into God’s presence” rather than that this someone died.

The figurative use of a harsh term instead of a mild term for an intended effect, such as when one calls a lawyer an “ambulance chaser.”

The figurative ascription of human qualities to something that is not human, such as the Old Testament prophet Isaiah, in his book’s 55th chapter, anticipates the day when the trees of the field will clap their hands.

A statement that appears to be self‐refuting but that is, in fact, true or possibly true, such as the statement, “The more things change, the more they stay the same.”

A combination of words that means something different than the words’ literal meaning, such as “You will do well if you play your cards right.”

Words that are used indirectly to signify a secondary meaning that is not patently obvious when the words are taken at face value.

Words that are used forthrightly to signify the person, place, thing, idea, action, or state of being that the words or combination of words evidently symbolize.

Question 3

Use this week’s textbook reading assignment to match the following terms with their definitions.

Question

A composite of your beliefs about human origin (where we came from), human nature (what makes us human), human purpose (why we are here), and human destiny (where we are going).

Someone who is aware of and content to live with an inconsistency between the belief system he or she professes and the one he or she practices

Someone who does not know that such an inconsistency exists because he or she chooses to disbelieve in its existence, even though this person has reason for believing that it does exist.

Someone who does not know that such an inconsistency exists because he or she has no reason to know it exists.

A person’s history of interactions with people whose input helps to shape the way he or she sees and acts toward the world.

A truth standard which holds that a belief, feeling, or behavior is acceptable if it promotes the greatest good not for the individual, but for humanity as a whole.

A truth standard which holds that a belief, feeling, or behavior is acceptable if it simply “works” for the person who holds it, regardless of whether it logically consists with anyone else’s experiences and standards.

Systems of belief that people develop on their own, primarily in response to what human standards have taught them to deem believable or acceptable.

Recognizes that God, the timeless, changeless source and sustainer of the universe and the source of all knowledge, discloses otherwise indiscernible foundational truths through Scripture, and that these otherwise hidden disclosures rightly frame and give direction to human questions to make sense of anything, including communication.

A truth standard which holds that a belief, feeling, or behavior is unacceptable if it is illogical or if it is at odds with what common
human observations tell us is true

Question 4

Use this week’s textbook reading assignment to match the following terms with their definitions.

Sees the universe as a self‐created, self‐sustaining machine, consisting of material processes and particles and nothing more than these, that invariably follow the course that physics has blindly programmed it to follow.

Holds that although we come to see the world as we do by the people who influence us through socialization, this neither has to be nor should be so.

Social constructionists who aim to show how social influencers can impact what people become and how privileged groups use this to promote themselves at others’ expense.

The attempt to make sense of human communicative behavior and specific human communications in the light of divine revelation.

Verbal and/or nonverbal behavior manifest God’s love to others in a way that promotes what God values in the world.

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